The Mount Sinai Department of Emergency Medicine

“Training Fellowships in PED ER” and
“R Baby Lectureship"

Over the past year, R Baby’s Pediatric Emergency Fellowship Program at Mt. Sinai has continued to develop educational initiatives in the area of infectious disease emergencies by contributing articles on infectious diseases in neonates in esteemed publications such as Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice, which has 1,000 subscribers and is accessed free of charge by 5,000 emergency medicine trainees. The project team, led by the R Baby Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, has continued to establish its educational initiatives through grand rounds lectures, posters, and podium presentations across the country. A fresh manuscript on testing practices of enteroviral infections in neonates is under review for publication.

SECOND YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
Over the past year, Mount Sinai’s Department of Emergency Medicine has continued to develop educational initiatives in the area of infectious disease emergencies by publishing articles on infectious diseases in neonates in esteemed publications such as Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice, which has 1,000 subscribers and is accessed free of charge by 5,000 emergency medicine trainees. The project team , led by the R Baby Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, has continued to establish its educational initiatives through grand rounds lectures, posters, and podium presentations across the country, and a fresh manuscript on testing practices of enteroviral infections in neonates is under review for publication. Additionally, the R Baby Pediatric Infectious Disease Symposium was a major success with 500 physicians attending to learn about the latest developments in pediatric emergency care from esteemed professionals.


FIRST YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
The Mount Sinai R Baby Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship is focused on research and education in the field of life-threatening pediatric infectious diseases with a special focus on enteroviral infections in the first year of life. Surveys demonstrated knowledge deficits and led to the creation of an educational product on enteroviral infections that was compiled from all the latest global information with new conclusions. The manuscript was published widely reaching over 10,000 emergency physicians. One key educational point emphasized was that even the most mild symptoms in a baby need to be carefully considered since these could be a sign of serious infection, which could prove to be fatal.